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Many thanks to educators around the State who’ve so generously shared resources. This list is adapted from resources collected from educators across the State and shared by the Maine Department of Education and by the Maine Curriculum Leaders Association.

Things that are always great!

  • Read, read, read! Read fiction, read non-fiction, read together, read alone.
  • Write and draw!
  • Play board games and card games! Games are powerful learning, and provide lots of great practice for problem-solving, communication, strategy, and use of numbers.

Other Ideas:

  • Play War or Peace with a deck of cards (flip two cards and add, subtract, or multiply them to find your number to compare)
  • Play Concentration with cards
  • Play BINGO with teen numbers, hundreds, and thousands (write numbers on a piece of paper with calling cards)
  • Make a collage with different shapes
  • Practice writing numbers with correct number formation
  • Play Guess My Number by doing greater than or less than a number guessed - use big numbers if you can!
  • Practice addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts
  • Use math while cooking! There’s a ton of great use of numbers, fractions, and mixed numbers involved in making recipes.
  • Go outside and take a notebook. Draw and write about what you find.
  • Write a personal narrative about that time school was closed and you had to do schoolwork at home!
  • Read Read Read! Read to a sibling, read to a relative, read over the phone, read to a stuffy!
    • When you read, ask questions like: Who are the characters? Where does the story take place? What happens in the beginning? Middle? End? What’s the problem in the story? Solution? Does this book remind you of another book you’ve read?
  • Write and draw your own book about your class, your family, your favorite things to do!
  • Find 5 words you didn’t know, and learn what they mean! Practice spelling them.
  • Make lists of words with the same endings: -at words, -ug words, etc.
  • Play Hangman (or play by building a snowman—guessing it before all parts are drawn on the snowman) with mystery words or sentences
  • Examine words in your cupboards. Make a list and then graph the results - which did you see most often?
  • Draw or write about what Maine will be like in 100 years. What will you do to make that happen?
  • Plan to interview someone about what life was like when they were little. Write down 5-10 questions that you will ask them. Take notes about their answers. Then, write and draw a story about life as a kid in their time.
  • Write or find a poem and draw an image that reflects the main idea
  • Create a junk sculpture using whatever found materials, write a page about what it means or represents (trash to treasure).
  • Create an image or write a creative description of Spring and the return of outdoor life.
  • Favorite Books: Reread a favorite fiction book from your own collection.
    • Jot down details/ideas/events you missed from previous reading(s); and/or
    • Share your observations with someone who has not read the book & encourage them to read it. After they read it, compare thoughts about the book: the characters, the setting, the plot, the theme, etc.; and/or
    • Use some character or place or event from the book and write a sequel; perhaps share the sequel.
    • If the book has no illustrations, draw/paint/or otherwise create a scene from the book.
  • Make a shoebox diorama to illustrate something you learned or something you read about
  • Design an animal hospital - what would the rooms look like? What would it look like on the inside? How about the outside?
  • As earth day approaches (April 22), your task is to interview an older adult about environmentally friendly ideas and/or programs that they witnessed. Ask them about things that have changed during their lifetime that were intended to help the environment. If they can't think of something, below are some things that may help stimulate their memory.
    • Pesticides
    • Lead gas
    • Lead paint
    • Dam removal
    • Dumping snow onto rivers
    • Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)
  • Draw a map of your favorite room in your house. Add all of the details that help make it your favorite room.
  • Design your dream house!
  • Create your own homemade microscope
    • Materials: Plastic cup (clear cup is best, though not required), clear plastic wrap, pair of scissors, rubber band, water, something to look at
    • Assembly:
      • Cut a small hole into the side of the cup (big enough to accommodate your specimen)
      • Put plastic wrap over the open top of the cup and use rubber band to secure it (should be tight across the top, like a drum)
      • Pour a little water onto the plastic drum at the top of the cup. There should be enough so there is a small pool of water.
      • Slide the specimen (i.e., leaf or twig or piece of yarn) into the hole at the base of the cup
      • Look through the puddle of water to see the specimen magnified
    • Questions for discussion: What did you notice? Did you see anything new? Why does this work? What happens when there is more light? What happens if there is more water or less water? What happens if the plastic at the top is not so tight, but is sagging?
  • Build a Rube Goldberg machine (complicated machine to perform a simple task) to solve a problem or complete a task (for example: turn off/on a light). In writing, state your task and keep notes on what you tried and revised about your machine. Take a picture or video if possible to share with your class!
  • "No screens challenge" Can you go an entire day without using any screen technology? Can you go 2 days? This means no electronic devices of any kind! After completing the challenge, write about your experience by answeringing the following: What did you think about this challenge? Do you think it is a good idea to take a break from technology? Why or why not? Make a list of all of the activities you did. What was most enjoyable? Why? What was the hardest thing? What made it so hard? Do you think this is something a child younger than you should also do? What is some advice you would give to a friend who wants to take this challenge?
  • Make a "bucket list" of the ten places in the world you would like to travel to during your life. For each location, write what you know about this place, what you want to learn about this place and why you want to go there. Draw a world map and with a series of arrows draw lines from one destination to another until you have planned your world wide route to all ten locations.
  • Spend an hour watching outside, and tallying what you see (birds, cars, etc.). At a different time of day, do you see different things?
  • Draw the moon every day - how does it change?
  • Find constellations and planets in the night or early morning sky.
  • Play family games, such as Monopoly, where students practice counting money.
  • Do arts and craft projects where students build or create using specific shapes or measurements.
  • Write a letter to a relative and mail it to them.
  • Play Scrabble or make your own Scrabble game with spelling words.
  • Write and illustrate a response to one of the following prompts:
    • Which would you prefer as a pet: a unicorn or a dragon? Why?
    • What is your favorite healthy snack?
    • What would your teacher be like if he/she was a zombie?
    • Do you like to read fiction or nonfiction. Why?